Wednesday, 16 April 2014

#522 In the field: Black-crowned night heron


I spent today photographing birds in the low-country
of coastal South Carolina at Brookgreen Gardens.  Brookgreen is not only home to America's largest
and most important collection of figurative sculpture,
but the museum's grounds and gardens boast an outstanding zoo, aviary, and  additional features
to entice and delight artists. 

I'm anxious to start a sculpture of a Black-crowned
night heron and while teaching a bird sculpture workshop during the day at Brookgreen,
I'm spending early mornings and evenings
at the enclosed aviary. . . experiencing,
studying, sketching, and photographing birds.

I'm gathering an enormous amount of reference and
am confident that I have sufficient material to successfully depict the species in the studio.  Typically,
I select a subject based upon memorable "in the field" experiences and my time spent with the Black-crowned night heron at Brookgreen has been rewarding.

www.brookgreen.org/‎



















To learn more about the subjects in this blog go to the links below.  

For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and 
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish



Sunday, 13 April 2014

#521 Remarque: Spring Pride


When I sign my work and send it out into the world, I think of a bird leaving the nest or perhaps 
of a child leaving home. I wonder how what I saw, felt and expressed will affect the viewer.


Spring Pride
6"H 11"W 8"D


To learn more about the subjects in this blog go to the links below.  

For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and 
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish
  


Wednesday, 9 April 2014

#520 Throw on another log . . . making it in the art world



Recently, a gallery owner told me that a collector had walked in with a group of paintings purchased at the gallery and wanted to return them . . . explaining that the paintings were impossible to live with after reading a political rant on social media by the artist who had created them . . . sadly, I knew the artist.

We all know the benefits of social media . . .  
we not only promote and reveal our work but communicate with fellow artists and friends, express our  conservation concerns and enjoy input and feedback. The flip side to this is the people out there who are interested in our art, who routinely monitor, see and read our posts but can truly be offended by politically charged,  controversial, non-art issues.                                                                                                                 
When I started out - over 40 years ago - computers were in the distant future and artists interfaced with collectors, galleries, museums, trade magazines, other artists  [excluding friends],  and the press; we socialized on a
different level and one topic was taboo:  politics.  It still should be.



To learn more about the subjects in this blog go to the links below.  

For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and 
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish
 


Sunday, 6 April 2014

#519 In the studio: The Tom Browning portrait


Last Sunday, I posted a blog about a new eagle monument in progress in the Wyoming studio . . . 
see post # 517, dated March 30, 2014.  Since then, I've had several inquiries about 
the portrait shown in the upper left corner of the image shown below.

The portrait  in my studio was painted twelve years ago by the superlative painter - Tom Browning.  Tom and Joyce have been dear friends for over 25 years.  Incredibly, one wing of the eagle that I'm now working on, years later, is shown on the far left side of Tom's painting!

This proves the comment I've posted several  times in my
blog that I routinely start a number of different sculptures and keep them "in progress" for many years . . . tweaking, refining, and eventually completing most - but not all - of them.

The Tom Browning painting is what I would grab on the 
            way out if I had a studio fire . . . oh, and the        
Kuhn drawings above the north windows.


 With Browning and Kuhn to inspire me, below are images of works in progress in the
northwest corner of the Wyoming design studio.
















To learn more about the subjects in this blog go to the links below.  

For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and 
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish
  

Wednesday, 2 April 2014

#518 In the field: Briscoe Museum, "Night of the Artists"


For more information about the Briscoe Museum's Night of the Artists,
scroll back to Post# 516, March 26, 2014.
http://www.briscoemuseum.org/about




Last weekend, I was deeply honored to be presented with the Briscoe Museum's
Legacy Award for Lifetime Achievement and to join the group of previous Legacy Award recipients:

Bill Owen,  2013
Martin Grelle,  2012
Ken Carlson,  2011
Kent Ullberg,  2010
G. Harvey,  2009
Clark Hulings,  2008
Howard Terpning,  2007

Below, it was a special honor to be introduced by my dear friend, Robin Salmon: Vice-President of Art and
Historical Collections and Curator of Sculpture at Brookgreen Gardens, Murrell's Inlet, South Carolina.
She flew in for the occasion and was the guest of the museum.
http://www.brookgreen.org



Below, Dr. Steven Karr, Executive Director of the Briscoe, presented me with the Legacy Award
last Friday night at the Night of the Artists awards gala.

     Image courtesy of Alamo Photographic 


 Image courtesy of Alamo Photographic


Below, I am with Jack and Valerie Guenther.  Jack and Val have been friends for over 30 years.
As founders of the Briscoe, it is their vision that has created a magnificent museum along
San Antonio's famed Riverwalk, dedicated to interpreting and celebrating the West.

 Image courtesy of Alamo Photographic 


      Below, I'm talking with fellow sculptor, T. D. Kelsey about his exciting new sculpture commission for the
Briscoe Museum.  The enormous work is scheduled to be installed in time for next years Night of the Artists.

Image courtesy of Alamo Photographic


To learn more about the subjects in this blog go to the links below.  

For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and 
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish
  

Sunday, 30 March 2014

#517 In the studio: new eagle monument



Throughout history,  the eagle is one of the few birds that has been successfully depicted larger than life by sculptors.
Common sense and logic tells the artist and viewer that not all birds should be monumentalized!
The eagle is one of the world's oldest symbols of power, resurrection and victory, and has been a traditional motif for sculptors for centuries . . . it is the symbol of our great nation.

Shown at right, is the small sketch or "maquette" that was
created to use as a guide for my new monument.





Below, are images of a new eagle monument that I started in the studio last month.  The initial drawings and reference have been assembled and a small clay sketch, called a "maquette", was developed and used as the precursor to blocking in the large sculpture design with very dense foam.  Afterwards, the large sculpture is shown being carved with a serrated knife and blocked in from the foam . . . it is then covered with oil-based clay and modeled before a mold is made and bronze casting begins.    The eagle in this sculpture is being presented approximately twice life-sized.









To learn more about the subjects in this blog go to the links below.  
For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and 
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish


Wednesday, 26 March 2014

#516 Briscoe Museum: Night of the Artists


The Briscoe Museum is presenting the 13th annual Night of the Artists Art Sale and Exhibitions.
It will be presented in the beautiful Jack Guenther Pavilion at the Briscoe Western Art Museum
and will showcase over 60 of the country's top Western and Wildlife Artists!
The Art Sale will be on Saturday, March 28, 2014.
The sale will be followed by a month-long exhibition from March 30 to April 27.  




The Briscoe Western Art Museum, named in honor of the late Texas Governor,  Dolph Briscoe, Jr. and his wife, Janey, preserves and interprets the art, and culture of the American West through engaging exhibition, educational programs, and public events reflective of the region's rich traditions and shared heritage.

The museum is located on San Antonio's famed River Walk, the institution is housed in San Antonio's first Public Library and newly constructed pavilion.  The Briscoe Campus consists of the historic Museum building, the Jack Guenther Pavilion, and the adjacent McNutt Courtyard & Sculpture Garden.

The Briscoe Western Art Museum preserves and interprets the art, history,and culture of the American West through engaging exhibitions, educational programs, and public events reflective of the region's rich traditions and shared heritage.

Below, are images of my work that will be in the show.

Briscoe Bison Maquette
26"H 37"W 9"D

 Tethered Goats
8"H 26"L 9"D

King of the Coop
18"H 18"W 7"D

Year of the Horse
16"H 10"W 4"D

Briscoe Briscoe
26"H 19"W 9"D


To learn more about the subjects in this blog go to the links below.  
For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and 
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish


Sunday, 23 March 2014

#515 Throw on another log: Touch



The imprint of an artist's touch cast in bronze on the surface of a sculpture has a living presence, as fingerprints and tool marks are a source of fascination for the viewer.  Run your hands over the surface of a
beautifully modeled sculpture feel the form, see with your hands.

Walk around the sculpture and use your hands and eyes to feel
your way in and out of the shapes.  New forms appear at every
angle - smooth, curved shapes, vigorously modeled passages,
hard edges . . . a source of endless discovery as the sculptor leads
you throughout space, giving you an experience inspired by nature.


One Saturday afternoon at an art show I watched a father take the little hands of his blind daughter and run 
them over the surface of "Charger". . . the sculpture below.  The young girl was touching and seeing the 
animal with her hands as her father guided her.  I watched as the girl focused on what 
she was feeling and realized that she was seeing a horse for the first time.


 Charger
26"H 25"W 9"D


 Nipper
19"H 18"W 12"D


 Standing Horse
12"H 11"W 6"D


Stars
16"H 15"W 6"D


Equus Found in clay



To learn more about the subjects in this blog go to the links below.  
For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and 
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish


Wednesday, 19 March 2014

#514 In the field: Briscoe Museum sculpture installation, con't . . .


For more information about the Briscoe Museum project and creation of the monuments in the studio, 
please go to posts #453: Aug. 18, 2013 through #461: Sept. 15, 2013.

We just returned from San Antonio and the installation of the Briscoe Museum of Western Art sculpture project.  
The scope of the work included two life-sized bas-relief bronze horse panels attached to gates and an enormous architectural relief panel depicting three running bison installed in a back-lit niche. . . while the previous post focused on the horse gates, this post focuses on the bison relief panel.

The sculpture design for the twelve foot alcove niche depicts three running bison.
Below, is the initial concept sketch that I presented to Jack Guenther and the Briscoe Museum staff for approval.



After approval of the drawing, a maquette was developed and modeled 40 inches in width.
The maquette, or study, is the precursor to creating a monument and is the artist's guide for creating the monument . . . measurements are taken to resize and enlarge 



Below, are images of the monumental panel being blocked in and carved with dense foam, 
then covered with oil-based clay called plastilene, and modeled.





Below, is an image of the installed monument.




Below, Executive Director,  Dr. Steven Karr and I stand in front of the sculpture.   
 Beautiful landscaping under the alcove was underway by the end of the installation day. 



The enormous panel is installed with stainless steel rods, attached to the back of the sculpture, 
and inserted into the limestone.  It is projected forward and positioned with space between the 
stone and back of the bronze sculpture allowing rheostat-controlled soft lighting from behind . . . 
thus creating a dramatic silhouette of the sculpture.  
Lighting was an important element of my initial concept, design, and proposal.  

Below, is an images of the back-lighting with Jack and Valerie Guenther.



Below, are images of the bronze architectural panel at the foundry during the patina process.








To learn more about the subjects in this blog go to the links below.  
For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and 
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish