Sunday, 14 September 2014

#565 Art shows: "Birds in Art" 2014, con't . . .



Please see the previous blog for more information about Birds in Art.

After the Birds in Art exhibition closes at Leigh Yawkey Woodson Museum 
in ten weeks, a selected portion of the show will tour the following museums:

Museum of the Gulf Coast, Port Arthur, Texas (Dec 5, 2014 - Feb 15, 2015);
Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum, Tucson (Apr 4 - May 24, 2015);
The Wilder Museum, Solvang, California (Jun 13 - Aug10, 2015);
Newington-Cropsey Foundation, Hastings on the Hudson, New York (Sept. 1 - Oct 23, 2015);
Gilcrease Museum, Tulsa, Oklahoma (Nov 22, 2015 - Feb 7, 2016).



King of the Coop was selected to tour and was also purchased by the museum for its' permanent collection.

King of the Coop
18"H 18"W 7"D


Birds in Art artists donate 4" X 6" paintings and drawings to a unique museum fundraiser called Project Postcard.  
The small works are offered to artists and collectors for 50.00 each and during the show they are hung together in a locked room.  No one can see them until ticket holders enter the room one at a time to view the work.  Participants 
have only one minute to make their selection and the ticket holders with the lowest number get first choice.  Artist's signatures are on the back and therefore no one knows whose work they are buying for a mere 50.00!  
The funds are used to purchase artwork for the museum's permanent collection.



Below, are images of my two Project Postcard entries. 



Below, Trish selected one of my drawings and I signed it for her as shown.



I went through the line twice and shown below are my selections.  I asked the artist, Debbie Stevens to sign her Whooping Crane painting for me and note the back of the wonderful duckling painting I purchased by Arlene Rheinish for only 50.00!

























Another museum innovation involves different artists working on the same painting and then signing the back.
Shown below are Jan Martin McGuire, Chris Bacon, and Robert Bateman taking their turn working on a pelican painting 
at the Saturday festivities for the artists at Hazelhurst . . .  the Leigh Yawkey Woodson family retreat 70 miles north of Wausau on Lake Katherine.  It's my understanding that the painting will be retained by the museum for its' collection.











The hospitality put forth by the staff and volunteers at the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Museum is treasured by
all who have participated in Birds in Art over the years.  The museum continues to have the reputation
among artists who attend as the most cordial, gracious, and artist-friendly art exhibition in existence.  


http://www.lywam.org



To learn more about the subjects go to the links below.

For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish

Wednesday, 10 September 2014

#564 Art shows: Birds in Art 2014




The Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum in Wausau, Wisconson opened its 39th annual Birds in Art Exhibition last weekend and it will run to November 16.  The prestigious show features art by 112 artists from around the world - 92 juried artists and 20 who have been named Master Artists in previous years by the museum.  Works by the Master Artists includes 15 paintings by the 2014 recipient Barry Van Dusen, who received the Master Wildlife Artist Medal during the opening weekend.

The fun-filled four days was a whirlwind of activey!  Camaraderie with fellow artists, guests, museum staff, and wonderful art, food, entertainment, and all things bird-related insured a fabulous and educational experience.

http://www.lywam.org



Below, are images and memories of the 2014 Birds in Art.



Below,  I was informed this week that "King of the Coop" has been purchased by the museum.
I'm delighted to have the sculpture be a part of the Leigh Yawkey Woodson's permanent collection.

King of the Coop
18"H 18"W 7"D


Below, Trish is with Birgit and Robert Bateman at the Friday night opening gala.




Below, I'm with Maynard Reece, legendary sporting artist.




Below, Bateman gave a wonderful demo Saturday morning on the museum grounds . . .
sprinkled with good humor and his thoughts about art.



More about Birds in Art and Leigh Yawkey Woodson Museum in next Sunday's blogpost.


To learn more about the subjects go to the links below.

For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish



Sunday, 7 September 2014

#563 The island studio in Canada: "First Season Promise", con't . . .



Shown at right is a new sculpture in progress entitled,
"First Season Promise".

Please see the previous post for information regarding this post.

The focus of this blog is dog anatomy and additional information can be obtained by going to:

Post #450, Aug 7, 2013       Post #448, Jul 31, 2013



All mammals, including humans, evolved from the same prehistoric source.  Therefore, it's logical that their skeletons are fundamentally the same.  Quadrupeds, like humans, have two arms and two legs . . .  their two front limbs are arms and their two back limbs are legs as illustrated below in the drawings of a dog's skeleton and muscles.

Dog Skeleton 



Front limbs



Back limbs 


Much can be learned about quadruped anatomy from household pets such as dogs and cats by
simply feeling where the joints move and articulate . . . can't be done on a Grizzly or Cougar!

In the drawing below of the front view of the dog, note the protruded
angle and position of the humerus attachment to the shoulder.


Over the years, I have collected many books about anatomy that are housed in the library at my Wyoming headquarters. Although I don't keep an extensive library at the cabin studio in Canada, There are several books that are indispensable
. . .  two are shown below, along with a wildlife artists' best friend . . . Zoobooks.



















To learn more about the subjects go to the links below.

For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish


Wednesday, 3 September 2014

#562 The island studio in Canada: "First Season Promise"


Every summer we spend time in Canada at the cabin/studio located on an island on Lake of the Woods in Ontario.  
During our time there last month, most days were rainy, windy, stormy, and on some days, 
cold enough for a fire.  Although we typically spend the summer days outdoors . . .
photographing, sketching, fishing and exploring the enormous lake by boat, 
the bad weather meant solitude and quality time in the cabin studio on the island.   

As the owner of a Brittany bird dog, I'm never without a model and subject matter and the fall-like weather was the perfect time to model a sculpture entitled, "First Season Promise".   The work depicts an English Setter and although similar 
to the Brittany, I paid special attention to their differences.  For design purposes, I modeled the 
English Setter because of its long tail . . . Brittanys have a short tail among other different characteristics.

Years ago, I created a sculpture similar to "First Season Promise" using the same breed, pose, and theme . . .
only a few were cast before faulty mold material - a product we no long use -  liquified and failed.  

Shown below, is a photo of our Brittany and silhouettes comparing the English Setter, (top) to the Brittany.





Shown below, are two views of "First Season Promise". . . the clay model in progress.
Working in the field with a beloved hunting dog inspired the sentiment I hope to convey with this sculpture.





Although I had computer access and books about dogs at the cabin regarding The American Kennel Club's 
official standard of every breed, my intent while creating the new work was not to present the AKC ideal of 
an English Setter but to present an eager, young dog bringing it's first retrieve to it's master in the field.

Important characteristics of the English Setter are the slightly domed head, the elegant fold of the low hanging ears, 
the long, square muzzle, the feathered tail carried in line with the back, and a slightly wavy coat.  
The English Setter was bred to "sit" when they discovered game birds so the hunter could 
shoot over them.  The dog would then retrieve the downed bird.


Below, I find it useful to have a drawing of the skeleton of the species I'm working on next to the sculpture stand.
Not only does it give information about slope of shoulder, waypoints and proportion, but is a constant 
reminder of where and how the joints articulate.  More about dog anatomy in the next blog post.



Below, is an image of an original etching entitled, "Eager".





To learn more about the subjects go to the links below.

For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish



Sunday, 31 August 2014

#561 In the studio: "Big Four of the Rockies", con't . . . the Elk


. . .  the fourth blog in a series of four regarding this subject.
For more information, start with post #558, August 20, 2014.


Four new small sculptures were created this summer depicting the Big Four of the Rockies . . .
the Grizzly, Moose, Bison, and Elk.  They will be introduced next month at Wilcox Gallery
in Jackson, Wyoming in conjunction with the Western Visions Exhibition at the
National Museum of Wildlife Art.
The focus of this blog is the Elk. . . also called Wapiti.

 Elk, like Moose, are members of the deer family, are plant-eaters, and have antlers instead of horns.
Antlers are grown and shed every year and given an adequate diet, the subsequent sets are larger.
New antlers are soft and tender and are covered with "velvet" . . . a layer of skin with short, fine hairs
and a network of blood vessels to nourish the growing antlers.  By summer. the antlers stop growing,
the velvet dries up and the animal rubs it off while preparing for the mating ritual called the "rut".
Antlers shed after mating season.

 In the Rocky Mountains, the screaming bugle of a bull Elk during the mating season
is as much a  symbol of autumn as the golden aspen leaves or the honking of migrating geese.

Below, are images of the clay model in progress of the new Elk sculpture.





All mammals, including deer, cats, bears, horses, humans, etc. evolved from the same prehistoric source and although their skeletons are fundamentally the same, I find it helpful to have a drawing of the skeleton of the species I'm working
on in front of me.  For more info regarding "Nature's One Pattern", please link to blogpost #448; July 31, 2013.

#448 Natures One Pattern

Below, are drawings of a deer's skeleton.  Note the zigzag pattern of the front limbs . . .
the pattern is repeated in the quadrupeds's back limbs.







Below, are drawings from my sketchbook.





Below, is an image of an original etching of an Elk.



"For the animal shall not be measured by man.  In a world older and more complete than ours,
they move finished and complete, gifted with extensions of the senses we have lost or never attained,
living by voices we shall never hear.  They are not brethren, they are not underlings; they are other nations,
caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendor and travail of earth."      

 -  Henry Beston
 The Outermost House,  1928



To learn more about the subjects go to the links below.

For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish


Wednesday, 27 August 2014

#560 In the studio: "Big Four of the Rockies", con't . . . the Bison



. . .  the third blog in a series of four regarding this subject.
For more information, start with post #558, August 20, 2014.


Four new small sculptures were created this summer depicting the Big Four of the Rockies . . . the Grizzly, Moose, Bison, and Elk.  They will be introduced next month at Wilcox Gallery in Jackson, Wyoming in conjunction with the Western Visions Exhibition at the National Museum of Wildlife Art.
The focus of this blog is the Bison.



  Research is the most time consuming and important aspect of my work in the studio.  The sculptor simply must understand structure, anatomy, and behavior of their subject before approaching the sculpture stand.  One of the more obvious characteristics of the Bison is the long hair on top of the head, the chin, and the forearms.
Modeling this surface texture with warm, soft clay outdoors in the summer was a welcome challenge!

Below, are two images of the new Bison sculpture in progress.





Below, is an image of a Bison skeleton.  Typically,  when modeling a specific species,
I keep a drawing of the animal's skeleton in front of me.  Thus, structural waypoints and joint articulation, bony protrusions which create hard edges, slope of shoulder, and proportion is realized.



Below, is a sketch from a recent trip to Yellowstone.




Below, is a large bronze sculpture bas- relief panel depicting a truncated design of the American Bison.

Bison I Fragment
26"H 35"W 8"D


To learn more about the subjects go to the links below.

For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish


Sunday, 24 August 2014

#559 In the studio: "Big Four of the Rockies", con't . . . the Moose


This is the second blog in a series of four regarding this subject . . . for more information, see the previous post.

Four new sculptures depicting the "Big Four" quadrupeds of the Rocky Mountain and Yellowstone region will be
introduced next month in Jackson, Wyoming at the Wilcox Gallery.  The "Big Four" are the Grizzly, Moose,
Bison, and Elk . . . the last blog featured the Grizzly and this post focuses on the Moose.

Wilcox Gallery requested this suite of small sculptures to introduce to their clients and my collectors during the Jackson September high season which coincides with the Western Visions Show at the National Museum of Wildlife Art.

Below, are images of the Moose clay model in progress.  All four of the new "Big Four" sculptures were created
outdoors this past summer and by using warm, buttery-soft clay, a smooth surface was achieved . . .  the use of
sculpture tools was kept to a minimum which imparted a spontaneous, free-flowing visual effect.  The sculptor
must have an understanding of quadruped structure and anatomy to work in this manner.  Anatomical waypoints
and proportion must be established and the animal's silhouette  - in this case, a moose - must shout,  "MOOSE!"
There should never be confusion about what animal an artist is attempting to depict!









Below, is a drawing of a deer's skeleton.  The Moose is the largest member of the deer family and the
anatomical similarities can be interpreted easily by the sculptor by observing and comparing differences
in proportion . . . for instance, the length of the legs of a moose are longer.  Typically, when working on
any species, I keep a drawing of the skeleton in front of me for reference.



Below, are recent photos taken in the field of one of my favorite subjects . . . the Moose.






To learn more about the subjects go to the links below.

For a complete list of the blog index go to the Index Page and
type the subject in the Search This Blog link on the right.


Blog, text, photos, drawings, and sculpture . . . © Sandy Scott and Trish